TOP FIVE REASONS WHY YOU SHOULDN’T USE EAR BUDS

//TOP FIVE REASONS WHY YOU SHOULDN’T USE EAR BUDS

TOP FIVE REASONS WHY YOU SHOULDN’T USE EAR BUDS

TOP FIVE REASONS WHY YOU SHOULDN’T USE EAR BUDS

Dr Jay Jindal Au.D. FSHAA, Consultant Audiologist

In a survey in South East England, it was found that an alarming 68% people were using cotton buds in their ears, with 76% of users using them at least weekly, if not more frequently. The primary reason (96%) given for using cotton buds was to remove earwax. When you try to clean the earwax with earbuds, it can be more harmful than not. Here are the top reasons why it is not a great idea:

WHAT IS THE HARM

  1. In the 30 years leading to 2010, more than 260,000 children visited US emergency department due to injuries related to use of cotton buds. Around 55% of them had either a hole in the eardrum or foreign body sensation. (Ameen et al, 2017)
  2. Here’s a more dramatic illustration of how cotton buds can not only be harmful for ear but also, damage your brains. Here’s a young 31 year old man who used cotton bud in his ear that got stuck inside without his knowledge, causing serious damage in the bones around the ear. Of course the ear is only separated from the brain by a very thin bone and the infection reached the part of the brain just above the ear. (Charlton and Rejali, 2019) A bit of cotton left in the ear may sound harmless, but in this case, it wreaked havoc
  3. There are numerous others and personal examples that I have from my own clinic, where earbuds have done much more damage than good. From my last 20 ears of professional experience I can clinically confirm that there is no wisdom in poking your ears whatsoever. In fact, the boxes of earbuds do come with a warning NOT to use them in the ears.

Therefore, do not put anything in the ear- nothing smaller than your elbow-goes the old adage. Yes, this includes hairpins, tweezers, straws, paper clips, pen, pencils and every other inanimate object that you use to clean your ears. I do hope you have not seen the disgusting video of a London official cleaning the ear with their glasses and then licking it. I should soon write another post on why you shouldn’t eat your earwax, I guess.

Until then, see more information here-What to do if you have earwax or itchy ears

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By |2020-12-07T08:24:19+00:00December 7th, 2020|Blog|0 Comments

About the Author:

Jay Jindal is a highly qualified independent audiologist, specialising in hearing care for both children and adults, auditory processing disorders, balance & dizziness and tinnitus management. He is also an expert in loud music or noise related hearing issues and has written several articles on how to protect hearing from loud music. His clinics are in London, Surrey, and Kent (Orpington, Sevenoaks, and Royal Tunbridge Wells) Jay is also professional development consultant and speaks on various audiology related topics at national and international events. He regulalrly organises world class paediatric and adult audiology events with speakers from all over the world via www.audiologyplanet.com Jay has worked at most of the speciality and super-speciality hospitals in London including, Guy’s and St Thomas’, Great Ormond Street, Royal National, Charing Cross and St George’s Hospital; and Harley Street, London Bridge and the Wellington Hospitals. As a recognition of his audiological expertise, he was awarded ‘audiologist of the year’ by an independent charity called Kent Deaf Children’s Society in 2013. Jay has worked with several national audiology professional bodies, which has an influence on how the hearing healthcare services are provided in United Kingdom. He is a member of regulatory body’s (Health and Care Professional Council) fitness-to-practice panel formulated to investigate the malpractices of hearing aid audiologists. Jay has many research publications to his credit, which are published in peer reviewed international journals. He is often invited to speak in national and international audiology events

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